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Updated: 11 weeks 6 days ago

Tiny robots get micro-tentacles to handle delicate objects 'gently'

Tue, 06/23/2015 - 14:31
Tiny robots get micro-tentacles to handle delicate objects 'gently'

Washington, Jun 23 - A team of engineers has developed micro-tentacles for tiny robots, so that they can handle delicate objects.

Lead author Jaeyoun (Jay) Kim from Iowa State University said that most robots use two fingers and to pick things up, they have to squeeze, but these tentacles wrap around very gently.

The paper describes how the engineers fabricated microtubes just 8 millimeters long and less than a hundredth of an inch wide. They're made from PDMS, a transparent elastomer that can be a liquid or a soft, rubbery solid.


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Humans, Neanderthals interbred in Europe

Tue, 06/23/2015 - 12:37
Humans, Neanderthals interbred in Europe

Washington, Jun 23 - As per a new study, early Europeans had recent Neanderthal ancestors.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute geneticists analyzed ancient DNA from the jawbone of a human who lived in Europe about 40,000 years ago, providing the first genetic evidence that humans interbred with Neanderthals in Europe.

Researcher David Reich said that they know that 45,000 years ago, the only humans in Europe were Neanderthals. But 35,000 years ago, the only humans in Europe were modern humans. This is a dramatic transition.


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Mass of tiny binary star discovered, thanks to its intense radio emissions

Tue, 06/23/2015 - 12:20
Mass of tiny binary star discovered, thanks to its intense radio emissions

Washington, Jun 23 - Researchers have discovered intense radio emission from a tiny binary star, which calls for a review of stellar models.

As per the University of Valencia study, this small binary star is known as AB Doradus B and is located in the AB Doradus star system, consisting of two pairs of stars. Stars normally emit light that can be seen with the naked eye or through telescopes, but some also emit radio waves, similar to those from televisions, mobile phones or microwave ovens.

Co-author Jose Carlos Guirado said that these emissions have made it possible to calculate the mass of the star, which is usually complex, but when the star is accompanied by another, its orbital motion gives us an accurate way to determine it, as Kepler's laws establish.


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